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Anticipating the 2018 Midterm Elections (October 2018): Conclusion

By Will Miller

Conclusion

On November 6, Americans across the country will head to the polls to vote for candidates at every level of government. National focus will be on results for the United States House of Representatives (where all 435 members will be up for election) and the United States Senate (where one-third of members will be vying for six-year terms). Given today’s political climate, in which questions abound about dysfunction in Congress, America’s image abroad, and the future ideological composition of the United States Supreme Court, it is hardly surprising that there is strong interest in the campaign and election literature. Scholars—and their fellow American citizens—will spend election night watching results, determining what worked and what didn’t for candidates, and debating what impact the election will have on the following two years of American government and policy. As the story continues to shift we, as readers of American politics, anticipate future analyses that will help explain the process by which government happens in the United States.